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Courses

PT1 Human Development I (Conception to Latency)
PT2 Human Development I (Adolescence to End of Life)
PT3 Attachment Theory and Object Relations

A major revolution took place in psychoanalysis when clinicians turned their focus from the purely sexual focus of Freud to the idea that being connected to others has importance way beyond just mating. First the school of object relations insisted on the primacy of the maternal bond over the child's protosexuality, then attachment theory went on to prove this point through animal studies and infant observation.

This course will examine the key writings and development historically, concerning object relations and attachment theories. Two texts include the key writings or comments on the historical significance of their contribution to the coming together of the object relations and attachment movements. Candidates will be asked to read the materials and be prepared to look at their historical context and impact on the psychoanalytic movement. Further still, we may examine how these documents sit with us at our practice of psychoanalysis, as well.

PT4 Culture: Development and Assumptions
PT5 Freud and the Discovery of the Mind

This course looks at Freud’s discoveries and how it influenced his theory of the mind and his use/invention of psychoanalysis to explore and treat a human being. 

PT6 Drive Theory and the Nature of the Unconscious
PT7: Trauma Theory and the Nature of the Unconscious
PT8: Modern Psychoanalysis I
PT9 Lacan

Lacan produced more original ideas than any other psychoanalyst except for Freud and Jung. His mind was a veritable cauldron of brilliant insights and an unspoken turmoil, which forced him to recast psychoanalysis in light of the precarious nature of the self, the power of the unconscious and the many ways our culture makes us who we are. We will examine Lacan's insights by viewing them as a method he was using to make sense of his own internal dilemmas: understanding Lacan through Lacan. This will allow us to obtain an empathic understanding of his seemingly abstruse and "difficult" theories, and see how these apply to us and all of our relationships. At the end of this course students will be able to conceptualize human experiences of self and patients in terms of Lacan's ideas, and know how to formulate interventions that incorporate these insights in a practice aimed at freeing patients from the tyranny of what was done to them.

PT10: Theories of Mind I (Klein, Bion, Kohut)

We will study the works of three foundational psychoanalytic thinkers who developed radically new ways of looking at how human experience develops, and at the nature and cure of psychopathology. Where Freud focused on drives, for Klein the relationship with, and internalization of, objects is root to the formation of mind. She recognized aggression as the source of most mental suffering, because it can never be felt towards the object without coming back on the self as external persecution. How the child is able to handle rage can lead to either psychotic, paranoid or depressive adaptations. Envy towards objects is another potently destructive force that Klein identifies as source of psychopathology when not balanced by gratitude. Bion created a powerful theory of mind based on how experiences are processed, or not, on an emotional level. But he also believed that the encounter of analyst and patient was based on an emotional understanding that was beyond theory, and aimed solely at the truth of feelings that had not been adequately bound by verbal processing. His interest in the immediate experience of patients is clear from his recommendation that analysts approach each session without memory or desire, as a verbalizing reflection. Kohut discovered that the self is constructed from the mirroring and idealizing responses a child receives from its caregivers (self objects), which create a healthy narcissism which is the basis for resilience and contentment. Indifference, criticism, belittlement and shaming wound the self’s narcissism and force the child to adopt compensatory strategies to assuage the hurting sense of self. Part of the analyst’s task is to be attentive to narcissistic wounds, external or happening in the analysis, and repairing them through acknowledgement and empathy.

PT11: Psychoanalytic Theories of the Mind II
PT12 Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis

To keep things brief we have only listed the neurological material in our course description. Everything we will learn is intimately applicable to our understanding of human experience. For instance, just as our minds have a fast and a slow way of processing, our synaptic messaging system does too. The Lacanian Imaginary is firmly rooted in kinship selection. Everything we cover in this class will always be understood in terms of its meaning for us psychoanalysts. The goal of this course is to familiarize ourselves with the material, neurological sources of all our psychic reality. The way we are wired determines what we see, how we interpret what we see and how we behave in reaction to it. Knowing the mechanics behind the ever-changing intricacy that is our mind, is a core aspect of working with mental suffering, the latter being something we can define with great precision neurologically, and which we can only change using our most sophisticated brain tool: speech. Neuroscience today is at it's most exciting time ever. We have brain imaging techniques that can see each neuron, synapse, spine and their connections. One can pinpoint exactly where in the hippocampus stem cells birth neurons awaiting use to form new neural pathways. We will also see how mental suffering comes about in terms of brain functions, and why talking is the only activity that can alleviate it at a neuronal level. In 1895 Freud started a "Project for a Scientific Psychology", which he quickly abandoned realizing that the neurology of the time was insufficient to meet his goal of understanding mental phenomena physiologically. Today this has finally become possible, and this class will show how it works.

PT13 Ethics in Psychoanalytic Practice
PT14 Research and Writing

Candidates owe a journal quality paper, written in APA format, between 25 and 30 pages. The paper can be theoretical or clinical, and has to include at least 15 references. You also will have to write a case presentation, where you examine your treatment of a patient, based on a list of psychoanalytic concepts that are essential to the conceptualization of a psychoanalysis. Candidates must subscribe to the PEP-WEB online psychoanalytic library. This gives unlimited access to every major psychoanalytic journal in the English language.  This course in research and writing will prepare the candidate for this task.

PT15 Modern Psychoanalysis II

This course covers in depth the advanced theory and practice of Modern Psychoanalysis as developed by Hyman Spotnitz M.D. to treat pre oedipal disorders. How to work with transference, resistance, and countertransference will be the focus of discussion. This course will focus on dealing with aggression and destructive behaviors and the use of emotional communication.

PT16 Psychopathology
PT17 Transference and Countertransference
PT18 Analysis of Resistance

This course covers in depth the core psychoanalytic idea of resistance. Clinical and theoretical readings will clarify and illustrate the development, evolution, and use of the concept from its early inceptions to present day theoretical conceptualizations and applications. Students will be able to articulate the origins, essential role and significance of the various types of resistance encountered in psychoanalytic treatment. Case material contributed by class members will also be used to foster experiential learning of resistance.

PT19 Character Analysis
PT 20 Analysis of Dreams, Fantasies and Symbolic Communication

From the earliest times of recorded history dreams have occupied a special space in human existence. Often, they were seen as giving access to dimensions beyond what was known and delivering messages to the dreamer that held significance for the individual and their communities. Being able to decode and understand their messages has fascinated people to the present day. After the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams in 1900 by Freud, dreams gained a central position in the understanding of the human psyche, especially in the hidden messages that reside in the unconscious. This opened the door of investigating the human mind from within, in a state that is free from conscious influence and control. In the field of psychoanalysis, the investigation of dreams and the dreaming process has expanded from Freud’s original hypotheses. It has broadened and deepened, albeit in contradictory ways. In this course we will explore some of the different ways dreaming is understood and conceptualized in clinical work and other disciplines including neuroscience. We will look into the manifest content of dreams along with the symbolism and associations we can derive. We will apply that to our clinical practice and how they can inform transference, countertransference, defensive mechanisms and fantasies about self and other. Participants are encouraged to keep a journal of their patients’ dreams and their own during the course.

PT21 Analysis of Psychotic and Primitive States
PT22 Practicum
PT23 Group Psychoanalysis
PT24 Child and Family Psychoanalysis
PT101 Training Psychoanalysis

A training analysis is a psychoanalysis undergone by a candidate as a part of her/his training to be a psychoanalyst; the (senior) psychoanalyst who performs such an analysis is called a training analyst.  A minimum of 400 hours with a certified analyst, including at least two years of weekly sessions is required for certification. For students wishing for a in-person experience, ten percent of required hours may be spent with a local analyst from a different orientation, provided that this analyst be NAAP registered.

PT102 Individual Supervision in Psychoanalysis

This class will introduce students to the principles of modern psychoanalysis, both in theory and practice. We will examine different transferences, counter-transferences, and how patients induce feeling in us. We will look at what interventions are useful in resolving resistances, especially in the case of highly traumatized and therefore 'difficult' people. Part of the focus will be on the role of the destructive drives in psychopathology. We will also learn how to deal with the stress of working with such patients and how to keep ourselves from burning out or developing reactions that could negatively impact our own lives. 200 hours of individual supervision is required for certification with at least 3 different supervisors. 50 hours must be taken with one supervisor focusing on one case (control analysis). PT 102 is part of Modern Analytic training, and should not in any way be construed as licensable and licensed supervision for the purpose of fulfilling State or insurance requirements!

PT111 Group Supervision in Psychoanalysis

This class will introduce students to the principles of modern psychoanalysis, both in theory and practice. We will examine different transferences, counter-transferences, and how patients induce feeling in us. We will look at what interventions are useful in resolving resistances, especially in the case of highly traumatized and therefore 'difficult' people. Part of the focus will be on the role of the destructive drives in psychopathology. We will also learn how to deal with the stress of working with such patients and how to keep ourselves from burning out or developing reactions that could negatively impact our own lives.